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  • The Obscure

    Ben Stevenson played football for Tuskegee Institute from 1923 -1930 (yep!). He was a running back/defensive back/kicker with 9.8 jets. He is a legend when it comes to HBCU football, but who is familiar with him?

    The Kansas City Blues Strummers recorded but one record in St.Louis in 1926, nobody knows who was in the band.

    Freezone (called himself that on the record) recorded but one song way back when. Nobody knows anything about him at all.

    James Whitehead wrote but one book....JOINER...a must read about the south and football.

    Charley Scales has gotta be about as obscure as an NFLer who made the team can be, ya see he played behind....Jim Brown.

    Love the obscure

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    Ben “Big Ben” Stevenson spent his first years at Tuskegee University as a prep-schooler, which at the time allowed him to play eight seasons in all for the Golden Tigers, from 1923 to 1930. During that span, the team amazingly suffered only two defeats. Stevenson combined speed (9.8 100-yard dash), strength and durability. Scoring on a combination of long runs and drop kicks, he also played defensive back, earning a reputation as one of the top pass thieves in the conference. Stevenson was named to seven consecutive Black College All-America teams, numerous Negro all-time All-America teams and was voted as the game's greatest all-around player.

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    One of the rarest and most obscure of the early country blues recordings. The mysterious Freezone left behind only one number, and this is it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YvzeCNICYk


    When it comes to movies...

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    ya Muromets (Russian: ???? ???????), known in the US as The Sword and the Dragon and in the UK as The Epic Hero and the Beast (significantly altered versions), is a Russian fantasy film directed by the noted fantasy director Aleksandr Ptushko, made at Mosfilm and released in 1956. It is based on the byliny tales of the bogatyr Ilya Muromets. The film has some differences from the byliny but remains surprisingly true to the original epic poems.

    This obscure flick features one of moviedoms greatest villians.

  • #2
    Re: The Obscure

    Originally posted by Dixon
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    ya Muromets (Russian: ???? ???????), known in the US as The Sword and the Dragon and in the UK as The Epic Hero and the Beast (significantly altered versions), is a Russian fantasy film directed by the noted fantasy director Aleksandr Ptushko, made at Mosfilm and released in 1956. It is based on the byliny tales of the bogatyr Ilya Muromets. The film has some differences from the byliny but remains surprisingly true to the original epic poems.

    This obscure flick features one of moviedoms greatest villians.
    Thank you, Dixon. You've taught me a new word--"byliny". I had to look that up. [I was familiar with Ilya Muromets only because he inspired Reinhold Glière's Symphony No. 3, a work I enjoy.]

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: The Obscure

      i usually enjoy my bylinys with lox and sour cream.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The Obscure

        Originally posted by tandfman
        Originally posted by Dixon
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        ya Muromets (Russian: ???? ???????), known in the US as The Sword and the Dragon and in the UK as The Epic Hero and the Beast (significantly altered versions), is a Russian fantasy film directed by the noted fantasy director Aleksandr Ptushko, made at Mosfilm and released in 1956. It is based on the byliny tales of the bogatyr Ilya Muromets. The film has some differences from the byliny but remains surprisingly true to the original epic poems.

        This obscure flick features one of moviedoms greatest villians.
        Thank you, Dixon. You've taught me a new word--"byliny". I had to look that up. [I was familiar with Ilya Muromets only because he inspired Reinhold Glière's Symphony No. 3, a work I enjoy.]
        The word byliny is derived from byl=was, so it roughly translates into past/ancient tales.
        I was unable to find an English equivalent of bogatyr. All dictionaries translate it as a hero, but it is not quite the same.
        "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
        by Thomas Henry Huxley

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: The Obscure

          Originally posted by tandfman
          Originally posted by Dixon
          paste
          ya Muromets (Russian: ???? ???????), known in the US as The Sword and the Dragon and in the UK as The Epic Hero and the Beast (significantly altered versions), is a Russian fantasy film directed by the noted fantasy director Aleksandr Ptushko, made at Mosfilm and released in 1956. It is based on the byliny tales of the bogatyr Ilya Muromets. The film has some differences from the byliny but remains surprisingly true to the original epic poems.

          This obscure flick features one of moviedoms greatest villians.
          Thank you, Dixon. You've taught me a new word--"byliny". I had to look that up. [I was familiar with Ilya Muromets only because he inspired Reinhold Glière's Symphony No. 3, a work I enjoy.]
          Cool

          The movie really is something a bit different. I saw it as just a kid and never forgot it. So you can imagine my excitement when I discovered it on youtube. Obviously it wasn't as...wow!...now as it was as a kid but still........unique!

          Well I'll be damn!!!!!!! I did not know this until right now, they are going to revive the movie. Bring it back.
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUCxiL57Idw

          So much for being obscure I'm sure nobody would believe me if I said I have thought how cool it would be if they redid the movie with todays modern technology....right

          Now we need Michael Moorcock's albino prince of Melniborn Elric and his runesword Stormbringer brought to the silver screen. If done right it could be something special.

          Comment

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