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Clueless writing about our sport

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  • gh
    replied
    we may be able to retire the trophy on this one. A headline today from GQ:

    New York Marathon 2017: will the two-hour barrier be broken?
    In the race to break the mythical two-hour barrier for the marathon, adidas has created its fastest, lightest road racing shoe yet. So will the new Adizero Sub2 create history in New York this weekend?

    Leave a comment:


  • Tuariki
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    that sent me to Goggle right quick
    Nothing wrong with that I guess; depending on who you are goggling at

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  • gm
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    that sent me to Goggle right quick
    I loved Private Eye back in the day!

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  • gh
    replied
    Originally posted by gm View Post
    I see you as a Grauniad type.
    that sent me to Goggle right quick

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  • gm
    replied
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    I do the Daily Telegraph crossword every day....so there...
    Well, I do the NYT version, so I wouldn't put much stock in THAT

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Originally posted by gm View Post
    I see you as a Grauniad type.
    I do the Daily Telegraph crossword every day....so there...

    Leave a comment:


  • 26mi235
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    This isn't really clueless writing about our sport--rather, it's the writing of a guy who seems to be challenged mathematically.

    It's in the story about the history of the Chicago Marathon (now linked on the front page here), and it mentions the legendary run of Pheidippides in 490 B.C. and then refers to Lester Foreman, who won the first Chicago Marathon in 1977.

    >>Foreman's run was separated from the person who brought the news from Marathon to Athens by nearly 1,500 years . . . <<
    Yes, but it is the type of mistake that is common. He subtracted a negative number (-490) and treated it as a positive one. I never 'understood' the mistake because the logic is so obvious but for those that do 'rote' arithmetic it occurs frequently (e.g., my son makes such sign errors all the time).

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  • gm
    replied
    I see you as a Grauniad type.

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    The Daily Mail....truly one of the worse papers on the planet...

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  • gh
    replied
    The Daily Mail is a rag to begin with, but how about calling Usain Bolt's absence from the IAAF's 10 AOY nominees a "snub"?!

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/oth...t-snubbed.html

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    490 B.C. . . . Foreman's run was separated from the person who brought the news from Marathon to Athens by nearly 1,500 years . . . <<
    I have noticed that journalism in the internet age is often filled with these kinds of errors, which I attribute to a lack of a copy-editor. But this is the Chicage Effin Tribune. Shame. Shame on the editor.

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  • tandfman
    replied
    This isn't really clueless writing about our sport--rather, it's the writing of a guy who seems to be challenged mathematically.

    It's in the story about the history of the Chicago Marathon (now linked on the front page here), and it mentions the legendary run of Pheidippides in 490 B.C. and then refers to Lester Foreman, who won the first Chicago Marathon in 1977.

    >>Foreman's run was separated from the person who brought the news from Marathon to Athens by nearly 1,500 years . . . <<

    Leave a comment:


  • Conor Dary
    replied
    How about this dumb NYTimes article on why Paris won the 2024...without once mentioning they were, after LA agreed to 2028, the only ones that wanted it.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/17/w...024-paris.html

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by aaronk View Post
    From today's IAAF report about a Half-Marathon in the Czech Republic (on front page)---

    They say the winner---Violah Jepchumba----set the Bahrain National Record with her 66:06.

    Then, later in the article, they mention she'd run 65:22 earlier this year----but NO mention of it being 44 seconds FASTER than her "National Record" of 66:06!!
    I guessing that she was a Kenyan at the time, and that her transfer of allegiance to Bahrain was approved after she ran the 65:22.

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  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    This one really had me scratching my head, wondering what the writer could have been thinking. Actually, it's the headline writer--there's nothing wrong with the story, which appeared on the website of the University of Iowa's school newspaper. The first paragraph is:

    >>After a weekend off, the Iowa cross-country team will head to Lincoln, Nebraska, for the Woody Greeno Invitational.<<

    But the headline says "HAWKEYE CROSS COUNTRY HEADS OUT EAST"

    One can only hope that the driver of the team bus didn't read the headline before getting out on the road. Nebraska is definitely West of Iowa.

    http://daily-iowan.com/2017/09/15/ha...eads-out-east/
    They've now updated the headline and replaced EAST with WEST. I guess someone else out there noticed it.

    Leave a comment:

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