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  • trevorp
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    I'm the weird factor in this equation!
    You're not alone. Welcome to the weird corner.

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by 26mi235 View Post
    I am rather surprised that Atticus was not familiar.
    As indicated in my second post, I HAVE heard of it in horse-racing, but it's use in this circumstance was just too weird for me (or, alternately, and may be the case here, I'm the weird factor in this equation!).

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  • 26mi235
    replied
    It is not commonly used in the US, but anyone with horse racing background had certainly heard the term (even if they did not bother to understand what it meant). I am rather surprised that Atticus was not familiar.

    In contrast to the comment about many friends not knowing the term, I used it a day or two ago with someone and they knew what I meant.

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  • booond
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    I believe it's a common term in horse racing even on this side of the pond (or at least it used to be).
    A maiden is a horse who has yet to win a race.

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  • trevorp
    replied
    In this Brit's experience, 'breaking his/her maiden' is not a commonly-used phrase. A quick survey of half a dozen friends yielded unanimous bafflement. 'Maiden' in this sense is more usually used to describe a plane's first flight or a ship's first voyage. In cricket, it is also used to describe an over (a series of six balls bowled) in which no runs are scored. Of horse-racing I know nothing, so it could be used in those circles.

    I'm not sure why some suggest the LetsRun article is of British origin: any link to another publication eludes me.
    Last edited by trevorp; 06-04-2016, 12:21 PM.

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  • cubehead
    replied
    It's commonly used in cricket, i.e. a maiden century, the first time scoring a hundred runs while batting, usually in a Test match. I've heard that expression countless times. However I've never heard it used anywhere else, except horse racing. In this case I think someone is just trying to be clever and purposely using a double entendre.

    It's letsrun...what else would you expect?
    Last edited by cubehead; 06-04-2016, 01:04 AM.

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  • tandfman
    replied
    I believe it's a common term in horse racing even on this side of the pond (or at least it used to be).

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    I believe it was Churchill who once described US and UK as "two countries, separated by a common language."

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by dukehjsteve View Post
    All dirtbags
    I prefer the term "Warped Sensibilities" . . .

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  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    All dirtbags ( imcludes me ) "got it" immediately.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by gm View Post
    Sometimes I wonder about you, man. It's a very common phrase in Britain.
    Well, then I say say to you, join the queue. :-)

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  • gm
    replied
    Sometimes I wonder about you, man. It's a very common phrase in Britain. Where the story was published. For British readers.

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Surely, you and I were not the only two to note the ambiguity of that phrase.
    Last edited by lonewolf; 06-03-2016, 06:55 PM.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by gm View Post
    What's wrong with that? Wasn't Rome his first DL win?
    Please parse the phrase 'breaks his maiden'. I believe this horse-racing term has an . . . **ahem" . . . alternate meaning.
    Last edited by Atticus; 06-03-2016, 06:18 PM.

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  • gm
    replied
    What's wrong with that? Wasn't Rome his first DL win?

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