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  • #16
    Re: Jazz?

    Originally posted by jazzcyclist
    Originally posted by Dixon
    I tried that with "Kind of Blue" by Miles Davis, I couldn't make it work.
    Try Coltrane plays the blues and tell me what you think.
    According to Rolling Stone Magazine, "Kind of Blue" is the top ranked jazz CD, with that one you mentioned the second. I 've heard Coltrane a few times I do prefer his sound to any other jazz cat.

    I do like Jellyroll Morton's blues stuff, yes he's done some of that. I have a Louis Armstrong CD from way back in the day like 1924, I like that also,

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    • #17
      Re: Jazz?

      Originally posted by Dixon
      Originally posted by jazzcyclist
      Originally posted by Dixon
      I tried that with "Kind of Blue" by Miles Davis, I couldn't make it work.
      Try Coltrane Plays The Blues and tell me what you think.
      According to Rolling Stone Magazine, "Kind of Blue" is the top ranked jazz CD, with that one you mentioned the second. I 've heard Coltrane a few times I do prefer his sound to any other jazz cat,
      Kind of Blue is the most popular jazz album of all times, partially because of its accessability, but it's not the be-all-and-end-all of jazz, there's a ton of good music out there. Besides Coltrane Plays The Blues, check out Joe Pass' Virtuoso for solo guitar, and for guitar ensemble, check out Wes Montgomery's cover of "Impressions" and "Four On Six" and for a classic piano trio, check out Oscar Peterson's We Get Requests.

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      • #18
        Re: Jazz?

        Yesterday, while walking the streets of the French Quarter, I discovered a New Orleans clarinet player who I had never heard of, and I thought I had heard them all. I then contacted a fellow jazz fanatic, who also happens to be a track and field fanatic, and asked if he had heard of her and he hadn't. Her name is Doreen Ketchens, she's classically trained, and sometime after Katrina, she and her husband Lawrence (trombone and tuba) took to the streets to play jazz, along with a few other local musicians who provided the rhythm. When they first started, their daughter was a toddler who could be seen in the background playing with toys, but now she's 11, and she's given up the toys for the drums, to make it a family affair. Here's the link to a few videos.

        Doreen Ketchens - The Clarinet Queen

        Doreen plays "When the Saints"

        Doreen plays "Just a Closer Walk"

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        • #19
          Re: Jazz?

          Artie Shaw, eat your heart out.
          I love New Orleans street music. Had never heard of Doreen but she grabs me and I am not even a jazz afficinado.
          I played saxaphone and trumpet in HS but could not get a squawk out of a clarinet so maybe I am just easily impressed/intimidated by someone who can.

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          • #20
            Re: Jazz?

            Originally posted by jazzcyclist
            Yesterday, while walking the streets of the French Quarter, I discovered a New Orleans clarinet player who I had never heard of, and I thought I had heard them all. I then contacted a fellow jazz fanatic, who also happens to be a track and field fanatic, and asked if he had heard of her and he hadn't. Her name is Doreen Ketchens, she's classically trained, and sometime after Katrina, she and her husband Lawrence (trombone and tuba) took to the streets to play jazz, along with a few other local musicians who provided the rhythm. When they first started, their daughter was a toddler who could be seen in the background playing with toys, but now she's 11, and she's given up the toys for the drums, to make it a family affair. Here's the link to a few videos.

            Doreen Ketchens - The Clarinet Queen

            Doreen plays "When the Saints"

            Doreen plays "Just a Closer Walk"
            The lady has some serious talent, great stuff

            Louis Armstrongs autobiography "Satchmo" a must read for any jazz fan. His story of growing up at a time when the police wouldn't even go into parts of New Orleans, I'll just leave at that.

            Another great read..."Black Music in America"....pretty much the roots of jazz.

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            • #21
              Re: Jazz?

              One thing I'm still trying to get to the bottom of is what she was doing all these years before Katrina. Based on what she said in the first video, she was trained in the conservatories and universities of New Orleans, but she also implied that jazz is relatively new for her and that she was intimidated at the thought of improvising when she and her husband first started playing on the streets. Putting 2 and 2 together, what I come up with is a woman who started out playing classical music in sympony orchestras before dscovering jazz due to dire circumstances, and perhaps that explains why I had never heard of her. If that's her story, it has all the makings of a good movie, especially with her 11-year-old daughter now a part of the band.

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              • #22
                Re: Jazz?

                Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                One thing I'm still trying to get to the bottom of is what she was doing all these years before Katrina. Based on what she said in the first video, she was trained in the conservatories and universities of New Orleans, but she also implied that jazz is relatively new for her and that she was intimidated at the thought of improvising when she and her husband first started playing on the streets. Putting 2 and 2 together, what I come up with is a woman who started out playing classical music in sympony orchestras before dscovering jazz due to dire circumstances, and perhaps that explains why I had never heard of her. If that's her story, it has all the makings of a good movie, especially with her 11-year-old daughter now a part of the band.
                So many stories similiar to hers.

                It was 1959, Alan Lomax is traveling the south looking to record anyone with some talent. He stops at a store in Como Miss to get a drink, while there he asks..."anyone around here know of any singers/musicians"....so he ends up at a farm. The guy he's looking for is out in the field on a tractor. Yep, Lomax walks out there and talks Fred McDowell off his tractor to record for him, right there on the front porch. "Mississippi" Fred McDowell would end up touring Europe and is considered one of the greats. What if Lomax doesn't stop to get a drink in Como Mississippi? McDowell was over 50 years old.

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                • #23
                  Re: Jazz?

                  Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                  One thing I'm still trying to get to the bottom of is what she was doing all these years before Katrina. Based on what she said in the first video, she was trained in the conservatories and universities of New Orleans, but she also implied that jazz is relatively new for her and that she was intimidated at the thought of improvising when she and her husband first started playing on the streets. Putting 2 and 2 together, what I come up with is a woman who started out playing classical music in sympony orchestras before dscovering jazz due to dire circumstances, and perhaps that explains why I had never heard of her. If that's her story, it has all the makings of a good movie, especially with her 11-year-old daughter now a part of the band.
                  So many stories similiar to hers.

                  It was 1959, Alan Lomax is traveling the south looking to record anyone with some talent. He stops at a store in Como Miss to get a drink, while there he asks..."anyone around here know of any singers/musicians"....so he ends up at a farm. The guy he's looking for is out in the field on a tractor. Yep, Lomax walks out there and talks Fred McDowell off his tractor to record for him, right there on the front porch. "Mississippi" Fred McDowell would end up touring Europe and is considered one of the greats. What if Lomax doesn't stop to get a drink in Como Mississippi? McDowell was over 50 years old.

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TyzAAwJnIw

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                  • #24
                    Re: Jazz?

                    http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/ ... /?ref=arts

                    Some obvious classics hereĀ (I have at least 50% of this list).

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Jazz?

                      did you know that Seb Coe was a great jazz aficionado? He once told me that some jazz magazine had rated his collection of jazz recordings as something like No. 3 in the world (hope I'm not hyperbolizing). I know he has thousands of records.

                      He talks jazz in here:

                      http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2008/m ... cgames2012

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                      • #26
                        Re: Jazz?

                        On the subject of track & field aficionados who are bitten by the Jazz Bug, it brings to mind Dick Bank, one of the great T&F experts of the '60s. Many television viewers will recall his "Look at Mills!" outburst during the final lap of NBC's coverage of the Tokyo 10,000m, or his work as commentator on the weekly T&F coverage of CBS Sports Spectacular, but from what I have heard he gave up track & field completely to pursue a career in jazz recording & production.

                        http://www.allmusic.com/artist/dick-bank-mn0001620146
                        .

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                        • #27
                          Re: Jazz?

                          Clint Eastwood, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bill Cosby are also celebrities who are fellow, lifelong jazz fans. Unfortunately, Jabbar's extensive jazz collection was destroyed in a fire in 1983, but my guess is that Eastwood's collection ranks high on the list due simply to his age and wealth. I had a close friend who was also a jazz fan, who made his living as a high school and college basketball coach before he retired, and who was only 3 1/2 years older than Eastwood. He had a mind-boggling jazz collection, and on a couple of occasions he mentioned some of the ways that he would further pursue his passion if only he had more money. Eastwood is on the board of directors of the Monterey Jazz Festival, and I've chatted with him on a couple of occasions while attending it. IMO, the Monterey Jazz Festival is a way more enjoyable experience than the New Orleans Jazz Festival, which I haven't attended since before Katrina, though part of that is due to its conflict with the Penn Relays.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Jazz?

                            Originally posted by gh
                            did you know that Seb Coe was a great jazz aficionado? He once told me that some jazz magazine had rated his collection of jazz recordings as something like No. 3 in the world (hope I'm not hyperbolizing). I know he has thousands of records.
                            Had not idea--fascinating. His interest stops by the late 1950s, I see...

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Jazz?

                              Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                              One of my great recent discoveries is the livestreaming of the performances at Jazz at Lincoln Center. I would gladly pay a fee for this service, but as luck would have it, it's free. Once you sign up, you get emails whenever a future performance is announced and again at the moment before the performance begins. The last week of December featured a six-day engagement by the Wynton Marsalis Septet. Tonight, I'm watching Herlin Riley play. Some of the events are archived. For anyone who has an appreciation for America's greatest musical contribution to the world, this is must-see/must-hear TV. Here's the link:

                              http://new.livestream.com/jazz/herlinri ... dium=email
                              I signed up a few months ago. Some of those jazz concerts are really good. The same site also livestreams performances of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Cool!

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                              • #30
                                Re: Jazz?

                                Since there is so much jazz interest here, I want to turn everyone on to a very good but largely unknown artist in the DC area named Chelsey Green. I discovered her last September at Reagan National Airport after checking in for my flight. She was performing a gratis concert in the main terminal with her band, collectively known as "Chelsey Green and the Green Project". Chelsey is a jazz violin player and covers many R&B and pop standards such as Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On" and "My Favorite Things".

                                Check her out on YouTube and on her website at http://www.chelseygreen.com/

                                I'm also into old school Bossa nova and people like Astrud Gilberto. I have this fantasy that she'll perform in Rio in 2016 along with Sergio Mendes.

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