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  • The National Geographic eight-hour docudrama about Aretha Franklin is excellent, with the star - Cynthia Erivo - doing an outstanding jog on all of the singing. Watched the first episode on Nat Geo, which polluted it with (seemingly) more commercials than content; after that we watched the rest commercial-free on Hulu - a far superior option.

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    • Originally posted by bad hammy View Post
      The National Geographic eight-hour docudrama about Aretha Franklin is excellent, with the star - Cynthia Erivo - doing an outstanding jog on all of the singing. Watched the first episode on Nat Geo, which polluted it with (seemingly) more commercials than content; after that we watched the rest commercial-free on Hulu - a far superior option.
      I had to quit the Tina documentary - too dark - we already knew that Ike was a very bad guy. Not enough about the joy SHE spread.
      I know Aretha had two kids by age 15. Is that a focus? There needs to be a balance.

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      • ain't it the truth?!!

        175032849_10158635322204213_5725598141810424614_n.jpg

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        • Originally posted by gh View Post
          Subtitles are your friend!

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          • given that my mother had a notable English accent, I always thought I had no problem, but when they moved Jane Tennison north from London and surrounded her with a bunch of Mancunian blokes the subtitling definitely came on!

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            • Between accents, muffled dialog & loud background noise, we find ourselves using subtitles a lot for shows/movies in English.

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              • Years ago, PBS showed a series based on the book, "All Creatures Great and Small", and I was really baffled by the Yorkshire accent. More recently, they've shown an updated version of the same story, but this time around, I can understand those accents better, I think because they've "softened" the accents for an American audience.

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                • Originally posted by Django View Post
                  Years ago, PBS showed a series based on the book, "All Creatures Great and Small", and I was really baffled by the Yorkshire accent. More recently, they've shown an updated version of the same story, but this time around, I can understand those accents better, I think because they've "softened" the accents for an American audience.
                  I really liked the original series....I had no problems and that was before I had ever been to England let alone North Yorkshire...also none of the principal actors have a North Yorkshire accent.

                  Anyways I have spent a lot of time in Herefordshire so try your luck at this.

                  https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YI0AbpV3wWI&t=60s
                  Last edited by Conor Dary; 04-18-2021, 10:21 PM.

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                  • Of all the British films I've seen this Bob Hoskins film was hardest to understand. And it was filmed in Nottingham where I lived for 4 years. It premiered in Nottingham where I saw it...and it seemed like an entirely different planet...

                    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dKUtD5s-z78&t=61s

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                    • If you want something that probably the majority of British people find difficult I can recommend Rab C. Nesbitt that is set in Glasgow:

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RW6Ub7h-B54

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                      • Originally posted by Trickstat View Post
                        If you want something that probably the majority of British people find difficult I can recommend Rab C. Nesbitt that is set in Glasgow:

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RW6Ub7h-B54
                        I caught a few words from the woman judge..

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                        • Originally posted by Trickstat View Post
                          If you want something that probably the majority of British people find difficult I can recommend Rab C. Nesbitt that is set in Glasgow:

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RW6Ub7h-B54
                          That's pretty funny.

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                          • Originally posted by Trickstat View Post
                            If you want something that probably the majority of British people find difficult I can recommend Rab C. Nesbitt that is set in Glasgow:
                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RW6Ub7h-B54
                            We were in Thurso (tippy-top of Scotland) a few years back and had occasion to sit with a couple in a local restaurant. We tried very hard to have a conversation with them, and while they understood everything we said (American TV Effect?), we finally had to give up and just nod and smile at whatever it was they were trying to tell us. I suppose we could have asked them to at least speak the Queen's English, but I had a sense that would have been insulting. Later we thought we should have asked them to make fun of Americans by imitating our 'accent' (as if!).

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                            • Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                              We were in Thurso (tippy-top of Scotland) a few years back and had occasion to sit with a couple in a local restaurant. We tried very hard to have a conversation with them, and while they understood everything we said (American TV Effect?), we finally had to give up and just nod and smile at whatever it was they were trying to tell us. I suppose we could have asked them to at least speak the Queen's English, but I had a sense that would have been insulting. Later we thought we should have asked them to make fun of Americans by imitating our 'accent' (as if!).
                              In the early '80s my Dad worked for an American owned company. They had a factory about 20 miles north of Edinburgh which was going to close and my Dad and 2 American colleagues spent a few days up there sorting out some arrangements. One night at dinner in their hotel, his colleagues admitted to my Dad that, while the people were very nice, they really couldn't understand what they were saying most of the time. To which my Dad replied that neither could he.

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                              • I just discovered the third episode of "My Grandfather's War" on PBS. Anyone know which streaming service I might be able to find the first two episodes on?

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