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  • #31
    Re: What a shame....

    That Harlan Hill was injured after his three first monster years.
    That a bad back kept Al Rosen to only 9 years in the major league.
    That Lowell Perry broke his pelvis after his first and only year.

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: What a shame....

      Originally posted by Dixon
      The greatest prewar guitar player was the guy who influensed Robert Johnson, that would be the great Lonnie Johnson. Jimi was less talented but far more creative.
      "All time greatest guitarists" ---according to Rolling Stone lists Jimi @ # ......drum roll .... #1. Robert Johnson ranked #71. Lonnie Johnson is nowhere to be found iun any list of top 100 greatest. Hendrix, on the other hand is listed as the #1 greatest guitarist of all time - in virtually every list. I'll stick with Rolling Stone and their panel of voters and Guitar World :

      cut and paste:

      Trey Anastasio, Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys), Brian Bell (Weezer), Ritchie Blackmore (Deep Purple), Carl Broemel (My Morning Jacket), James Burton, Jerry Cantrell (Alice in Chains), Gary Clark Jr., Billy Corgan, Steve Cropper, Dave Davies (The Kinks), Anthony DeCurtis (Contributing editor, Rolling Stone), Tom DeLonge (Blink-182), Rick Derringer, Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), Elliot Easton (The Cars), Melissa Etheridge, Don Felder (The Eagles), David Fricke (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), Peter Guralnick (Author), Kirk Hammett (Metallica), Albert Hammond Jr. (The Strokes), Warren Haynes (The Allman Brothers Band), Brian Hiatt (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), David Hidalgo (Los Lobos), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Lenny Kravitz, Robby Krieger (The Doors), Jon Landau (Manager), Alex Lifeson (Rush), Nils Lofgren (The E Street Band), Mick Mars (Mötley Crüe), Doug Martsch (Built to Spill), J Mascis (Dinosaur Jr.), Brian May, Mike McCready (Pearl Jam), Roger McGuinn (The Byrds), Scotty Moore, Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth), Tom Morello, Dave Mustaine (Megadeth), Brendan O’Brien (Producer), Joe Perry, Vernon Reid (Living Colour), Robbie Robertson, Rich Robinson (The Black Crowes), Carlos Santana, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Marnie Stern, Stephen Stills, Andy Summers, Mick Taylor, Susan Tedeschi, Vieux Farka Touré, Derek Trucks, Eddie Van Halen, Joe Walsh, Nancy Wilson (Heart)

      A few of these you could possibly recognize as perhaps having "some" knowledge of guitar playing, I'm guessin

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: What a shame....

        Originally posted by Dixon
        What an amazing talent he was.
        Herb Score. He could have been as good as Sandy Koufax. Outstanding talent when fate intervened.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: What a shame....

          Originally posted by no one
          Originally posted by Dixon
          The greatest prewar guitar player was the guy who influensed Robert Johnson, that would be the great Lonnie Johnson. Jimi was less talented but far more creative.
          "All time greatest guitarists" ---according to Rolling Stone lists Jimi @ # ......drum roll .... #1. Robert Johnson ranked #71. Lonnie Johnson is nowhere to be found iun any list of top 100 greatest. Hendrix, on the other hand is listed as the #1 greatest guitarist of all time - in virtually every list. I'll stick with Rolling Stone and their panel of voters and Guitar World :

          cut and paste:

          Trey Anastasio, Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys), Brian Bell (Weezer), Ritchie Blackmore (Deep Purple), Carl Broemel (My Morning Jacket), James Burton, Jerry Cantrell (Alice in Chains), Gary Clark Jr., Billy Corgan, Steve Cropper, Dave Davies (The Kinks), Anthony DeCurtis (Contributing editor, Rolling Stone), Tom DeLonge (Blink-182), Rick Derringer, Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), Elliot Easton (The Cars), Melissa Etheridge, Don Felder (The Eagles), David Fricke (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), Peter Guralnick (Author), Kirk Hammett (Metallica), Albert Hammond Jr. (The Strokes), Warren Haynes (The Allman Brothers Band), Brian Hiatt (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), David Hidalgo (Los Lobos), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Lenny Kravitz, Robby Krieger (The Doors), Jon Landau (Manager), Alex Lifeson (Rush), Nils Lofgren (The E Street Band), Mick Mars (Mötley Crüe), Doug Martsch (Built to Spill), J Mascis (Dinosaur Jr.), Brian May, Mike McCready (Pearl Jam), Roger McGuinn (The Byrds), Scotty Moore, Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth), Tom Morello, Dave Mustaine (Megadeth), Brendan O’Brien (Producer), Joe Perry, Vernon Reid (Living Colour), Robbie Robertson, Rich Robinson (The Black Crowes), Carlos Santana, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Marnie Stern, Stephen Stills, Andy Summers, Mick Taylor, Susan Tedeschi, Vieux Farka Touré, Derek Trucks, Eddie Van Halen, Joe Walsh, Nancy Wilson (Heart)

          A few of these you could possibly recognize as perhaps having "some" knowledge of guitar playing, I'm guessin

          I have Rolling Stone Magazine doing the top 100 guitarists and it has both BB King and Robert Johnson ranked in the top seven. Both were heavyly influensed by the great Lonnie Johnson.


          They also rank bluesmen T-Bone Walker, Buddy Guy, Lightn 'Hopkins. None of them are revered as much as Lonnir Johnson. He was the first truly amazing guitarist having first recorded in 1925.

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: What a shame....

            I think I've pretty much heard them all and there is no doubt Lonnie Johnson has to be mentioned if we are talking "important" and the guitar.

            Copy

            Lonnie Johnson's early recordings are the first guitar recordings that display a single-note soloing style with use of string bending and vibrato. While it cannot be proven that this contains the influence of earlier players who did not record, it is the origin of Blues and Rock solo guitar. Johnson's influence is obvious in Django Reinhardt, T-Bone Walker and virtually all electric blues guitar players.
            One of Elvis Presley's earliest recordings was Johnson's blues ballad, "Tomorrow Night" written by Sam Coslow and Will Grosz, which was also recorded by LaVern Baker. In 1957, it was also recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis.
            In the liner notes for Biograph, Bob Dylan describes his encounters with Johnson in New York City. "I was lucky to meet Lonnie Johnson at the same club I was working and I must say he greatly influenced me. You can hear it in that first record. I mean Corrina, Corrina...that's pretty much Lonnie Johnson. I used to watch him every chance I got and sometimes he'd let me play with him. I think he and Tampa Red and of course Scrapper Blackwell, that's my favorite style of guitar playing."[20] Also, Dylan wrote about the performing method he learned from Robert Johnson in Chronicles, Vol. 1. Dylan thinks Robert Johnson had learned a lot from Lonnie. Also some of Robert's songs are seen as new versions of songs recorded by Lonnie.


            Copy



            LONNIE JOHNSON was America’s premiere pre-war blues guitarist. Johnson was truly one of the first crossover artists influencing both jazz and blues musicians alike. However, Johnson crossed other musical styles. According to John Lee Hooker, “I love Lonnie Johnson. He was a genius. And nobody sound like Lonnie Johnson. Oh, he could play a lot of notes, but you could tell who he was because he had his own style, man. He’s blues and he’s pop—there’s some of everything the way he plays it.”
            Born into a large musical family (one of twelve children) in New Orleans 1894, Johnson’s first instrument was the violin. He often played with his father’s string band but his interests started to expand beyond the violin to include guitar, banjo, mandolin, and piano. According to Big Bill Broonzy, Johnson could play “all the things you could make music on.” In 1917 Johnson went on a two year trip to London with a musical revue (whose name is lost to history) only to return home to find his entire family save one brother had died during the flu pandemic of 1918.


            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oopuY8Ko ... D18D69B78B





            One of my current favorites

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: What a shame....

              robert johnson being ranked @ #7 was the opinion of ONE man - a rolling stone editor - while the one I referenced was conducted by numerous acknowledged excellent guitar players and musicologists. Big difference. While the other guys you listed have a place - it wasn't in the top 100

              ---------------------------------
              and one from JJ - RIP - a tasty instrumental

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3G_msX9iHwg

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: What a shame....

                Originally posted by no one
                robert johnson being ranked @ #7 was the opinion of ONE man - a rolling stone editor - while the one I referenced was conducted by numerous acknowledged excellent guitar players and musicologists. Big difference. While the other guys you listed have a place - it wasn't in the top 100

                ---------------------------------
                and one from JJ - RIP - a tasty instrumental

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3G_msX9iHwg

                Well actually there was another Rolling Stones Magazine Top 100 guitarists prior to one you are talking about, I have the magazine and there everyone is ranked as I mentioned. There's a picture the ranking and a mini bio.

                JJ Cale so totally under appreciated by the main stream. He's one of my favorites, I have most his stuff. Yep...RIP.


                This is from 2003


                Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Guitarists


                1 Jimi Hendrix - Can't argue with this. With his output cut short, he could have been much greater.
                2 Duane Allman of the Allman Brothers Band - Cetainly the greatest slide guitarist ever. Another career cut short.
                3 B.B. King - I assume he's this high because of influence and what he accomplished in a long career. Technically, he's got the blues chops but doesn't really waver much from that.
                4 Eric Clapton - I probably differ in opinion from many, but to me, Clapton peaked on Dekek and the Dominos and his solo records have been spotty at best. He was great for a time but never really blows me away.
                5 Robert Johnson - Blues legend. Recordings aren't very listenable. Created so much but relatively unheard.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: What a shame....

                  key words "prior to" - I like to stay current - 2011 and with the experts deciding ... not one person

                  Rolling Stone Magazine first compiled a list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time in 2003. The idea came from Senior Editor David Fricke

                  of course if you want to go with an even more recent one man compilation you can go with Edward Jennings in 2012 ... feel free to check that one out and where people stand

                  if you don't want to stay current that's on you I guess - 50 experts versus one is pretty obvious about a more representative outcome amongst those in the know. Sorry, dems the facts. Well I'm really not sorry

                  Carry on, into the void. I'll leave you to your own devices

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: What a shame....

                    Originally posted by no one
                    key words "prior to" - I like to stay current - 2011 and with the experts deciding ... not one person

                    Rolling Stone Magazine first compiled a list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time in 2003. The idea came from Senior Editor David Fricke

                    of course if you want to go with an even more recent one man compilation you can go with Edward Jennings in 2012 ... feel free to check that one out and where people stand

                    if you don't want to stay current that's on you I guess - 50 experts versus one is pretty obvious about a more representative outcome amongst those in the know. Sorry, dems the facts. Well I'm really not sorry

                    Carry on, into the void. I'll leave you to your own devices
                    I was obviously going by that 2003 poll since it was the only one I knew of. So yes there is Johnson ranked number 5. Like I mentioned I have that magazine. How does anyone drop from 5 to 71 in a time period no longer than that?

                    I seriously doubt a lot of those who voted know much about Lonnie Johnson, Tampa Red, Scrapper Blackwell or Robert Johnson. I just can't see most of those guys listening to that old stuff. I doubt very few of them can talk about Blind Willie Johnson***, a guy Eric Clapton has called the greatest "slide" guitarist ever. Then there's the great Blind Gary Davis.


                    I listen to everything and always have. My music library is immense, everything from those antique/primitive blues from the 20's to the White Buffalo, Black Keys, yep even some rap. Then there's all those books on the origins of it all. Music one of my four big passions (other than family) right there with track, football and literature. Pretty deep into those intersts.

                    You cannot have any blues guitarists on any list of the great guitar players and leave off Lonnie Johnson or Tampa Red or Srapper Blackwell. yes you can have a list just about rockers, but thar's not what happened. There were blues cats there so the list was bogus because of those I mentioned not being there.


                    *** one of his tunes on a record floating around in space in case the aliens have record players



                    I do doubt the magazine was interested in making that poll a history lesson since their readership is young.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: What a shame....

                      stayin in the void as I was confident you would

                      no more from me -

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: What a shame....

                        Originally posted by no one
                        stayin in the void as I was confident you would
                        History doesn't change, when it comes to music it's all about influenses. You read any bio of any recording artist and you'll read....."I grew up listening to Hank Williams (somebody) on KVXY radio (somewhere) out of Tulsa". You read about The Rolling Stones and it's Brian Jones obsession with slide master Elmore James (who isn't on the list)and Micks love for old blues records. Hell, they even got that name from an old Muddy Waters tune..."Rolling Stone". Then there's Pink Floyd, they got that name from taking old pre1940 blues cats PINK Anderson and FLOYD Council first names. Council being really obscure, where they found out about him...?

                        As you can see being in the...void....is pretty cool

                        You cannot talk the guitar here in America and not talk about those old blues masters who came way before the rockers.

                        Johnny "Slim" Campbell was a monster guitarist, he knew the history of it all and played a 1934 National steel guitar, Here he is playing a tune Led Zeppelin covered, most thinking it's a Zeppelin tune. The original was recored back in the 30's by Memphis Minnie herself a great guitarist and her husband Kansas Joe McCoy.

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-LPvl0stGE


                        Here's where Zeppelin got it....


                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swhEa8vuP6U

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: What a shame....

                          Originally posted by jazzcyclist
                          What a shame that Xavier Carter didn't have his head screwed on right. Ponder this:

                          Usain Bolt age 20 PR's - 10.03, 19.75, 45.28
                          Xavier Carter age 20 PR's - 10.09, 19.63, 44.53


                          While Carter is the classic example of a great talent that ..............???? Sprintdom is full of young guys we see on the lists who....poof!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: What a shame....

                            Originally posted by KDFINE
                            That Harlan Hill was injured after his three first monster years.
                            That a bad back kept Al Rosen to only 9 years in the major league.
                            That Lowell Perry broke his pelvis after his first and only year.
                            Hills first three seasons were amazing, he had 32td's and averaged over 20 yards a catch. Then as you mentioned it was never the same. One of the great small colege NFLers.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: What a shame....

                              Lilian Board.

                              That is all :cry:

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