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  • what looks like polio but isn't?

    "new disease" baffling NorCal investigators

    http://www.sfgate.com/health/article/Do ... 332776.php

  • #2
    Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

    This syndrome is extremely concerning. So far, there have only been a few cases reported, but who knows when an epidemic might flame out .
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley

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    • #3
      Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

      Currently in the Bay Area with three granddaughters, ages 7 to 1. This situation is alarming to say the least, especially as it is supposed to start with that catch all "flu like symptoms".

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      • #4
        Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

        if it's any consolation, the current population is about 7 million, and with the few cases reported, chances of anything bad are so small as to be almost immeasurable (the classic "more dangerous to try to cross the street")

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        • #5
          Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

          Originally posted by gh
          if it's any consolation, the current population is about 7 million, and with the few cases reported, chances of anything bad are so small as to be almost immeasurable (the classic "more dangerous to try to cross the street")
          Infectious diseases usually start with a few cases here and there before an epidemic flames out. It does not have to endemic to a small region either, but attack nations/continents/world. I hope that my fears do not materialize, but having seen the devastation that polio caused before mass vaccination began, I worry.
          BTW, I matriculated in med school in 1956 (2 years after Czechoslovakia instituted mass compulsory immunization against polio) and never saw a fresh case, only residuals.
          "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
          by Thomas Henry Huxley

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          • #6
            Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

            Originally posted by Pego
            BTW, I matriculated in med school in 1956 (2 years after Czechoslovakia instituted mass compulsory immunization against polio) and never saw a fresh case, only residuals.
            In the 90s I saw probably 4-5 patients with post-polio syndrome but not so much anymore.

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            • #7
              Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

              Originally posted by bambam
              Originally posted by Pego
              BTW, I matriculated in med school in 1956 (2 years after Czechoslovakia instituted mass compulsory immunization against polio) and never saw a fresh case, only residuals.
              In the 90s I saw probably 4-5 patients with post-polio syndrome but not so much anymore.
              Are you referring to the static residuals or a progressive syndrome mimicking ALS decades after acute polio?
              "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
              by Thomas Henry Huxley

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

                Originally posted by Pego
                Are you referring to the static residuals or a progressive syndrome mimicking ALS decades after acute polio?
                The static residuals. In orthopaedics we call it post-polio syndrome. I never saw the other thing you're referring to, although I had several patients with ALS, including one of the doctors here in town.

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                • #9
                  Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

                  I remember being utterly terrified of polio as a kid, largely because my aunt spent most of her adult life on crutches (imagine getting polio when you had kids aged 2 and 3!). The linkages they made to it being water-born had me exceedingly reticent (this is as a second-grader or so) to ever get in a lake or pool when there were other people around.

                  There was nothing I hated more than needles, but I remember being eager for Salk when it was finally developed.

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                  • #10
                    Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

                    I was born in 1952 and didn't know enough to be scared. But I was lucky enough to also get both Salk and then Sabin oral vaccine.

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                    • #11
                      Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

                      I specifically remember sitting on the shores of Lake Okanagan in '55 or '56, my fears only buttressed by the comic book I was reading, which had a public service announcement in it ("careful kids!") about the dangers of public waters.

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                      • #12
                        Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

                        Originally posted by bambam
                        I was born in 1952 and didn't know enough to be scared. But I was lucky enough to also get both Salk and then Sabin oral vaccine.
                        I was born just before you. I think I remember that we got both but I only directly remember actually getting the oral vaccine - walked in an got the sugar cubes, as the whole school participated. No one was on an anti-vaccine crusade at that point.

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                        • #13
                          Re: what looks like polio but isn't?

                          Polio was a real threat when I was a kid.
                          When vaccines were administered at my elementary school no parents hesitated with concerns about negative effects because the consequences of polio were all too evident.
                          I was aware of several people in my hometown who lived in "Iron Lung" full-body respirators and others confined to wheelchairs or having to walk with crutches.
                          Not long after I started kindergarten some poor kid came down with polio (don't know what became of him... he just disappeared from our class) and the school took out the big rug we all sat on for incineration somewhere.
                          Still, we were too young to be really scared. Not even the monthly get-under-your-desk and brace for the nuclear attack drills made any impact on us!
                          The scariest health concern to me was the possibility of developing a goiter... a disfiguring problem that was relatively common back in the not really so good except in your imagination old days.

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