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i can't read Russian, but....[and WADA says '05 resampling was wrong]

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  • i can't read Russian, but....[and WADA says '05 resampling was wrong]

    I doubt there is a completely clean Russian race walker or any other competitor from the last 25 years.

  • #2
    Originally posted by 1runner1 View Post
    I know this might be deleted by all this doping crap coming up from years ago further convinces me of the rampant doping as far back as the 80's...but of course, we can't talk about that....that doesn't mean it wasn't there.
    Doping was widespread in our sport long before the eighties; I doubt many here would deny that. There's quite a gap between knowing doping was widespread and having evidence that a specific athlete was doping, though.

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    • #3
      It has always been a mystery to me why the Russians, East Germans, Bulgarians (Eastern block countries) had so much immediate influence in the IAAF and IOC when they came into the sport internationally in the 50's and 60's. "Everybody" knew they were doping, as were some of the Americans and "others", the difference being that the East Europeans were engaged in state sponsored and supported programs while the rest were mostly a self-administered, hit and miss type endeavor (We have to do it also to be competitive). The problem seems to have "quieted" down in the late 80's and 90's, but with the recent advances in "pharmacology" it has reared its ugly head again.

      Somewhat off the subject, but it has also amazed me how much success our women swimmers had against the Eastern block, especially the East Germans, in that early time period.

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      • #4
        I have checked to see if the normally over-the-top subset on LetsRun has been running with this story and so far nothing has appeared. Interesting lack of crossover.

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        • #5
          Yup, Mutko also states the whole retesting goes against the WADA code and laws can't be applied retroactively, so this must be it.
          Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gh View Post
            next curious question: since the statue of limitations is 10 years, is this just data that's not actionable (in which case why did they do it, other than to destroy track a little bit more), or is it something that was resampled last year and they're only just now getting around to announcing it?
            Pure guess on my part, but it would further weaken any case by the Russian federation to try to get re-instated for Rio. It could also be a tool on WADA/IAAF's part where these use this information to discredit any Russian attempt to say the problem is new or not systemic.

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            • #7
              I still find it funny that a country that has been banned from competition due to state sponsored doping can be given a chance to change, if the government that has backed and funded the programme is still in power.
              This is why the whole thing is just a silly charade. Let the Russians pretend to put the silly new procedures in place with whatever Doping Agency is going to (try) and test them, and let them compete for goodness sake. Otherwise do the right thing and ban them for at least an Olympic cycle.

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              • #8
                We are the frog.

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scorpion_and_the_Frog

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                • #9
                  They might not be directly admissible, but I still think that it is yet another factor in assessing the Russia situation, especially since it would have led to numerous second offenses including winners of Golds (and WRs?).

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                  • #10
                    Not sure if it was within this thread or not but I'm one who finds it odd that these are only listed as "Russian" positives.

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                    • #11
                      If there are a lot of doggy results, following them up is presumably what you want to do. Targeting follow up of such results is the efficient use of anti-doping resources. Like targeting a top NCAA athlete that gets tagged by the NCAA for a violation.

                      There is a major meldonium scandal in Russia with the entire U-18 hockey team testing meldonium and the entire team was pulled and replaced with the U-17 (i.e., birth-year 1999) team and the coach canned. In addition, two other teams (volleyball) was pulled from the European Championship and curling were pulled at the last minute and replace by entirely different squads. In the story, apparently in the entire Russia Junior hockey only 8 drug tests were conducted in 2015 and maybe none in 2016.
                      Last edited by 26mi235; 04-07-2016, 04:23 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 26mi235 View Post
                        ..... In the story, apparently in the entire Russia Junior hockey only 8 drug tests were conducted in 2015 and maybe none in 2016.
                        [/SIZE]
                        Doesn't sound good. But, a a matter of interest, how many drug tests were conducted in the USA for junior hockey in 2015 and 2016?

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                        • #13
                          Will, the subset that do NCAA hockey probably get tested more than this...

                          [and probably more than NZ Junior hockey...]
                          Last edited by 26mi235; 04-08-2016, 11:11 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
                            Doesn't sound good. But, a a matter of interest, how many drug tests were conducted in the USA for junior hockey in 2015 and 2016?
                            LOL!

                            Good lord.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 26mi235 View Post
                              Will, the subset that do NCAA hockey probably get tested more than this...

                              [and probably more than NZ Junior hockey...]
                              You are the one who makes accusations / insinuations about other nations but seem to think the rules you want to impose on other nations shouldn't apply to the USA because of the course the USA can be trusted whereas Russia, China, Jamaica, Kenya can't.

                              If you want to belittle the Russians for only conducting 8 tests on the junior hockey players then you should be prepared to back your implied accusations / criticisms by informing us how many USA junior hockey players are tested. For that matter, given that I understand ice hockey is a big sport in Wisconsin, how many juniors do you test there?

                              And I would say that very definitely the Russians test way more junior hockey players than we do in NZ. I am pretty sure that we in NZ do not test junior hockey players given that I am not aware we actually play the game.

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