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what's an "underclassman"?

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  • gh
    replied
    what's an "underclassman"?

    split from turn-pro thread

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    Just came across a website I had not been familiar with. It's vocabulary.com, and it doesn't seem to be related to any publisher of dictionaries. They define underclassman as "an undergraduate who is not yet a senior".

    I'll think I'll stick with the major dictionaries.
    That's called Confirmation Bias.
    I got it too!

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  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    The Merriam-Webster, Random House and American Heritage dictionaries all define underclassman as a freshman or sophomore.
    Just came across a website I had not been familiar with. It's vocabulary.com, and it doesn't seem to be related to any publisher of dictionaries. They define underclassman as "an undergraduate who is not yet a senior".

    I'll think I'll stick with the major dictionaries.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vault-emort
    replied
    the only reason i came into this thread was to see what the hell an 'underclassman trickster' was..

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  • Merner521
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    That's pretty good. I don't have a problem with either definition (but I'm in the first two years - under, last two- upper camp)

    The terms should at least be mutually exclusive!

    Of course, red shirting does mess with this. You can be a 3rd year sophomore, and a 5th year athlete might even be a grad student (which I might take to mean that they have no class at all).

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  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    You KNOW dat ain't true!
    Yeah, I kinda suspected that wouldn't be true--not in this crowd. :-)

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    The last word on this subject?
    You KNOW dat ain't true!

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  • tandfman
    replied
    The last word on this subject?

    https://english.stackexchange.com/qu...school-college

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  • ATK
    replied
    Iv'e never heard of a Junior being considered an underclassman.

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Anybody not a senior.

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  • 26mi235
    replied
    I always though it meant the lower classes - 9 and 10.

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  • donley2
    replied
    Originally posted by NotDutra5 View Post
    Same here. Always thought the reference was to non-seniors. I may have thought wrong but I also have not heard it used in these parts as anything other than that. However we're in nearly the same parts which may explain why we have similar experiences.
    Nah. Born and raised in Kansas been in Texas a few decades, alway thought it meant non seniors. Of course grammar etc. is not my specialty.

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  • NotDutra5
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    Dictionaries are notoriously resistant to change - they can't afford to move with the times lest the change be fleeting. I have NEVER heard the word used in conversation to mean anything other than 'non-seniors', and I've been 'in school' for 40 years.
    Same here. Always thought the reference was to non-seniors. I may have thought wrong but I also have not heard it used in these parts as anything other than that. However we're in nearly the same parts which may explain why we have similar experiences.

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by tandfman View Post
    But it's not an "old" definition that I cited. It's the definition that currently appears on the websites of those three dictionaries.
    Dictionaries are notoriously resistant to change - they can't afford to move with the times lest the change be fleeting. I have NEVER heard the word used in conversation to mean anything other than 'non-seniors', and I've been 'in school' for 40 years.

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    The 'old' definition was arbitrary and nonsensical, so this TOE will side with Google!
    But it's not an "old" definition that I cited. It's the definition that currently appears on the websites of those three dictionaries.

    Leave a comment:

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