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  • Baseball stats

    I think baseball stats are more interesting than T&F stats, for some reason. Maybe because they are sometimes so crazy-specific. Yesterday the Braves' Ronald Acuna hit a leadoff home run in both games of a doubleheader. He becomes the fourth player ever to do that.

    I mean....who keeps track of that shit? HOW can they know some of the little trivial things that they know? I mean, for that bit of trivia, someone, sometime, had to say, has anyone ever led off both games of a doubleheader with a HR? And then they somehow had to plow through decades and decades of box scores, game summaries, etc to figure that out (I'm assuming they were on top of this one before everyone had a PC or Mac at home). My god!

  • #2
    I believe that every MLB game for which there is a record (yes, going back to 1800s) has been uploaded into a DB.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gh View Post
      I believe that every MLB game for which there is a record (yes, going back to 1800s) has been uploaded into a DB.
      That's one cool filter that pulls up 'lead-off hitter HR in both games of a double-header".

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      • #4
        True and true. But I bet they had this kind of stat before the trivia geeks were using computers. Unless it was NASA dudes playing around between missions.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DrJay View Post
          True and true. But I bet they had this kind of stat before the trivia geeks were using computers. Unless it was NASA dudes playing around between missions.
          Of course....it is such an oddity..and so rare...typical of baseball trivia for anyone who follows this stuff like I did once long ago...years ago there would have been a list of stuff like this...

          The season is so long and dull.... baseball statisticians and dedicated fans had to have something to keep awake...I had a few books with all sorts of useless stuff...unassisted triple plays...4 strikeouts in a inning...etc...

          Cricket is the same....even more so...check out the annual Wisden for weird trivia....I suspect Peter Matthews has a full collection...
          Last edited by Conor Dary; 08-14-2018, 08:49 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gh View Post
            I believe that every MLB game for which there is a record (yes, going back to 1800s) has been uploaded into a DB.
            See here - https://www.retrosheet.org/ - this is the project that is trying to resurrect full scorebooks of every MLB game since the 1800s. They are missing certain years.

            A few years ago I was at the Hall of Fame and got a personal, inside tour because I had helped them on an exhibit of baseball at the Olympics. They showed me all the scorebooks they have for every game over the years.

            Yes, the entire MLB archive is databased - see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baseball-Reference.com. These are the same guys that did our www.sports-reference.com/olympics.

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            • #7
              Baseball is indeed dull and its deep statistical traditions emphasize this special dullness. The only way I can express how dull it is, is to compare baseball to ... football ... and football ... and basketball ... and golf ... and tennis ... and cycling ... and ... track & field ... and on and on...

              All equally dull, unless you factor in the one thing that makes all the difference -- somehow a person comes to be entertained and amused and interested and to care about such things. That's the part that can never be entirely explained.

              Earlier this summer I had the opportunity to see/hear Yo-Yo Ma perform Bach's six cello suites. A few people in front of me bailed after #3 or 4. Perhaps they were thinking, "jeezus why didn't this guy just stop here -- it just goes on and on and on, and it all sounds the same." I kind of liked it. My friend, who is a cello player herself, was in heaven.

              I used to be a baseball player -- pitcher. I love watching that art. I don't really care about who led off both games of a doubleheader with a HR. On the other hand, I find marks-for-place stats pretty interesting. And national all-time lists.

              All these things humans do with sticks and balls and running and jumping and throwing, and making music, other art, etc., constitutes an important part of what makes living here worthwhile.

              And yes, I am ready for another track meet, which will be so much like every track meet I have ever watched.

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              • #8
                So well said, Master Po

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                • #9
                  I think you either enjoy/like baseball or you don't. I loved playing baseball but being a right handed batter blind in left eye, I was a deplorable batter. If, through walk/HBP/miracle I got on base, I could steal my way to third base.. dubious baseball credentials.

                  My eldest daughter, a Seattle attorney, who has no back ground and virtually no interest in any sport except baseball, has season Mariner tickets, attends most home games, knows the players..and knits through out the game while somehow being aware of game situation and coming alive at critical moments. She says she just likes the slow pace of the game.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DrJay View Post
                    True and true. But I bet they had this kind of stat before the trivia geeks were using computers. Unless it was NASA dudes playing around between missions.
                    This 1996 story about the Elias Sports Bureau suggests that incorporating computers (beginning in 1975) is what gave them the ability to come up with the most arcane stats.

                    https://www.nytimes.com/1996/04/21/b...he-arcane.html

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                    • #11
                      My database search skills are quite rusty but the basic run through the MLB database to see who might have led off both ends of a double header with a homer should be kinda quick.

                      • First, only look at games that are the first game of double headers. That limits the database of all games to relatively few records.
                      • Then check those few records for lead-off homers by either team. That will limit the resulting data dramatically.
                      • Now check those few records for second-game leadoff homers by the same guy.


                      The database may be large but the search routine is pretty simple. That said, I am often amazed at the trivial bits of trivia that come out of baseball stat geeks.

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                      • #12
                        I love baseball, but even more so, baseball stats. Baseball stats are by far the best stats of all the sports. So many layers, so many things to analyze, so many stats to memorize. Ah!! It's heaven!
                        You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post
                          I love baseball, but even more so, baseball stats. Baseball stats are by far the best stats of all the sports. So many layers, so many things to analyze, so many stats to memorize. Ah!! It's heaven!
                          I'll second that

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