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  • "the end of football is a long way off"

    https://www.houstonchronicle.com/spo...f-13171261.php

  • #2
    We'll see. Football as we know it will die a death of a thousand cuts. If we could somehow time travel 20 years into the future the game would be unrecognizable.

    Exhibit A - https://www.wcpo.com/sports/high-sch...-be-inevitable
    There are no strings on me

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    • #3
      Hard to know....there is so much money involved at the college level it seems difficult to believe it will go anywhere soon....Northwestern of all places just opened a $270m football facility.

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      • #4
        If it's not outright banned as the evidence continues to pour in regarding the effects of the game on the brain of every player(starting as early as high school), the question will be will the public want to watch a sport devoid of the violence that makes it so popular
        There are no strings on me

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        • #5
          They never banned boxing....so the idea of banning football seems a bit far fetched....

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          • #6
            CTE research is a relatively recent field of study. I suspect if it was around 30 years ago boxing wouldnt be today, though I'm not sure the percentages regarding CTE in the boxing population vs football are going to be equivalent.

            Like I said - I give it 20 years before it's legislated out, either by elected officials, or more likely the sport itself
            There are no strings on me

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
              They never banned boxing....so the idea of banning football seems a bit far fetched....
              Boxing has been limited in scope and relegated to the 'thug' corner of the sportsworld (at the pro level, at least). Football involves suburban moms who wouldn't think of letting their babies do anything that could hurt them. As the medical science gets out there, there's going to be litigation, and it's litigation that will kill the sport (as we know it) . . . sooner than later.

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              • #8
                And guys like this dont help it's cause

                http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports...821-story.html
                There are no strings on me

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                • #9
                  RN friend of family told her son no more Fb. He's an OT and maybe the biggest LM in school. It didn't go over well with coaching staff.

                  Could FB maintain its status if it becomes a minority sport to the tune of Bb numbers?
                  I don't think so. It will outlive us but probably not the next generation.

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                  • #10
                    In the 1950s the 3 biggest sports in the US were baseball, boxing, and horse racing. Things change. But I think legalized gambling on sports will help football, and maybe offset the problems it will have from CTE.

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                    • #11
                      I read recently that over the last 5 years or so the # of kids playing tackle football at the middle school level (not in California, thank God) has decreased by an average of 3% per year. It will consist of a couple of super conferences/30 or so schools who will compete in the "playoffs"...other than that it will be a "club" sport by 2040: not that far off. P.S...boxing needs to eliminated from OGs!!!!!

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                      • #12
                        We've seen this behavior before. It doesnt end well for the player

                        http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/2...making-threats
                        There are no strings on me

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                        • #13
                          I think those sounding the bell of death for football are doing so more than as a rooting interest than any real reality will support.

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                          • #14
                            medical neuroscience still doesn't know why there are athletes who have had tremendous head hits/shots yet still are doing well at very advanced age. I don't know about American football but there are Chuvalos and LaMottas in boxing. Perhaps with advanced medical screening those with the genes to withstand CTE can be spotted and allowed to continue while the rest be persuaded away, and the sports can survive.

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                            • #15
                              I am inclined to agree with the assertion in this thread's title, even though my 'rooting interest' -- if there were one -- would probably be otherwise.

                              The world will of course change in ways I can't imagine, much less predict, and that process does not need 20 year increments to register its surprises on me.

                              But as I sit here now, and try to imagine the 'legislative death' of football, I can't come up with a scenario in which a state or federal legislator -- in almost every district in the USA -- could advocate for such, and be elected or re-elected.

                              As for other suggestions about the possible diminishment of the sport, I see pretty much everywhere such deep investments in the sport by supporters in school districts, and in colleges/universities almost everywhere. People will put their own and their community's and their institution's resources into this incredibly expensive enterprise, even when it depletes and exhausts other capacities, and even when risk factors are presented regularly in the news.

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