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I guess some parents really DO want their kids to go to college

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  • user4
    replied
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Another thing that jumped out at me. The parents involved are quite wealthy, but not the *super* rich. They can’t just write a $15 million check to pay a legal bribe to get their kids in. They are products of what I call “fractal inequality”
    A variation of the conditioning property of the Pareto distribution.

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    Headline and sub-head:

    Lori Loughlin, husband to plead guilty in college admissions scandal, agree to serve prison time

    Prosecutors say the "Full House" actress faked the athletic credentials of her daughters to get them into USC.
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...andal-n1211941

    Leave a comment:


  • TN1965
    replied
    "Hot Pockets heiress Michelle Janavs sentenced to 5 months imprisonment in college admissions scam."

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/25/us/mi...cam/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • 1runner1
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    7 Stanford coaches were approached with bribes, but only the sailing coach took the bait

    https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...y-14879684.php
    wonder how the not so rich folks feel about kids getting their education paid for because they are good at sailing?

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    Headline: Former investment firm CEO sentenced to 9 months in college admissions scam

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/07/us/do...cam/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • bambam1729
    replied
    Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
    n the West Texas oil fields in the 30s-40s the fathers of athletic sons were recruited to work in another town. I knew an oil executive in Fort Worth who played six years of HS football in four different towns , four years at Army during WWII (which, he alleged, did not count toward collegiate eligibility), four years at Baylor, back to oil patch at age 30.
    Lonewolf, I think there was some rule re WW2 and those who were at West Point or Annapolis and they were eligible to play elsewhere after the war. I seem to recall several of them ended up playing for Notre Dame.

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    n the West Texas oil fields in the 30s-40s the fathers of athletic sons were recruited to work in another town. I knew an oil executive in Fort Worth who played six years of HS football in four different towns , four years at Army during WWII (which, he alleged, did not count toward collegiate eligibility), four years at Baylor, back to oil patch at age 30.

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    This was going on when I was in high school many years ago, although not on this scale, and not involving magnet schools. But it happened that some high schools were considered to be better than others, and some parents had their kids use relatives' addresses to get into the better schools. Again, this was not at all common, but it did happen. I went to the best non-specialized high school in my city, and over the years, I did come across a few schoolmates who were not actually living in the district.

    I also heard anecdotally about a few guys who went to schools out of their district because they had a better basketball or football team.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by bambam1729 View Post
    Meanwhile, not just happening with college admissions - https://www.fatherly.com/love-money/...=pocket-newtab
    Wasn't much of a secret. It goes on all over the US, even right here in the two big HS academic magnets and the one big Arts HS.

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  • bobguild76
    replied
    Ditto!

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    wow!

    Leave a comment:


  • bambam1729
    replied
    Meanwhile, not just happening with college admissions - https://www.fatherly.com/love-money/...=pocket-newtab

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    7 Stanford coaches were approached with bribes, but only the sailing coach took the bait

    https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...y-14879684.php

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by DrJay View Post
    On 60 Minutes, Lori Loughlin’s vacuous daughter made a vacuous statement during her vacuous return to her vacuous influencer YouTube show, glad to be back with her vacuous influencees who no doubt are vacuously thrilled.
    Sigh. We are indeed in the Kardashian Era now.

    Leave a comment:


  • DrJay
    replied
    On 60 Minutes, Lori Loughlin’s vacuous daughter made a vacuous statement during her vacuous return to her vacuous influencer YouTube show, glad to be back with her vacuous influencees who no doubt are vacuously thrilled.
    Last edited by DrJay; 12-02-2019, 01:45 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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